Uses for Expired Yogurt

Posted on January 4, 2008 by Allie

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Lauren e-mailed me last week with an interesting eco-friendly tip:

“I was looking around the internet today for a way to use VERY expired yogurt, and came across this great post at You Grow Girl: http://www.yougrowgirl.com/thedirt/2007/06/12/tomatoes-like-milk/. She explains how to use expired milk to feed your plants, AND in the comments section, someone offers their recipe for making ricotta from expired milk. Just thought it was kind of a cool idea. It sounds like a really cut down mixture could be used with expired yogurt as well, but do you have any great, green ideas for old yogurt to share?”

I’d never thought of things to do with expired yogurt, but I love that Lauren is even looking at expired yogurt as a recycling opportunity.

I poked around and found a few more interesting things to do with yogurt.

Reader’s Digest has a “recipe” for making moss paint out of expired yogurt and moss you have growing in your yard.  Mix it up in a blender and paint it on terracotta flowerpots, the stones in your garden, between your walkway tiles, or anyplace you want moss to grow.

If the yogurt isn’t too far gone, but past the point where you want to eat it, Reader’s Digest also has recipes for facial treatments, finger paints and sunburn relief.  Check out all the recipes here.

Also, check out some of the things yogurt can help you with before it goes bad — it can help your body fight everything from yeast infections to asthma attacks, diarrhea and possibly even cancer.

Thanks, Lauren!

12 Comments +

  1. Wow, that is such a cool idea with the moss. There are so many things that go bad in my fridge, and I try and salvage them, but I never know what to do. Any ideas for bad carrots and parsley?

    January 4th, 2008 at 8:29 pm
    Comment by Noelle
  2. The yogurt container is one thing, but I never thought much about recycling the yogurt itself. Actually, I’m a yogurt fiend, so I never have to throw any away. The container has proven problematic, though, as our local recycling center doesn’t accept #5 plastic.

    January 4th, 2008 at 10:06 pm
    Comment by mickey
  3. I know, I love the idea of recycling expired food for non-food uses. I hadn’t really thought of it before. I’m so glad Lauren e-mailed.

    Bad carrots and parsley? Leave them out for the bunnies? Or stick the carrot in some dirt and see if it grows? Compost? (We’ll be getting into that this spring, I think).

    Mickey, you’ve inspired me. Tomorrow I’ll do a yogurt container tip.

    January 4th, 2008 at 11:48 pm
    Comment by Allie
  4. Well, I meant Monday. :)

    January 5th, 2008 at 5:54 pm
    Comment by Allie
  5. [...] Tuesday – Uses for Expired Yogurt [...]

    February 21st, 2009 at 4:29 pm
    Pingback by This Week’s Tips
  6. Oooh, I use the old yogurt containers like tupperware. The big ones, anyway. The little ones would barely hold two mouthfuls of food!

    February 21st, 2009 at 6:05 pm
    Comment by nancypearlwannabe
  7. School art departments can use the larger yogurt containers for painting.

    March 8th, 2009 at 6:59 pm
    Comment by Kris
  8. I’ve started making my own yogurt and keep it in glass jars for the week (1 qt of milk makes just enough for the week and leaves enough to make a new batch). Cuts back on both yogurt waste and no more plastic cups to boot!

    May 5th, 2009 at 1:46 pm
    Comment by Jules
  9. [...] has some uses for expired yogurt. I never thought there were [...]

    May 15th, 2009 at 10:00 am
    Pingback by Quick Green Reads For The Weekend Volume 117. | The Good Human
  10. [...] expire? Reader’s Digest has some great advice for using up old yogurt (via good human via allie’s answers). The post has instructions [...]

    May 15th, 2009 at 5:32 pm
    Pingback by Make your yogurt and paint with it too | green LA girl
  11. I love the idea of finger paints, (I’m thinking bathtub finger paints for the kiddos) and the moss idea is pretty neat too. Make your own yogurt to avoid the plastic containers. Find instructions here http://www.scrimplythrifty.com/how-to-make-homemade-yogurt-without-a-yogurt-incubator/
    Also for old fruits and veggies you can have a worm bin. This is where you keep worms in a bin to recycle your veggie scraps and paper/cardboard into worm castings which are one of the best fertilizers for your garden or house plants. You can find instructions on the net.

    February 7th, 2012 at 1:29 pm
    Comment by ScrimplyThrifty
  12. I am house sitting for two weeks and decided to help out the “hippie” homeowners by cleaning out their fridge. They had so many containers of expired yogurt I figured I should look it up in case they have a plan for them (besides a science experiment in the fridge). I think I will ask them before I toss!

    May 4th, 2012 at 8:53 am
    Comment by Amanda

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Tip of the Day

If It Doesn’t Smell, Don’t Wash It

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According to Real Simple, if every American made an effort to launder less — cutting out just one load of laundry a week per household — we’d save enough water to fill seven million swimming pools each year.

So if it looks clean, and it smells clean, call it clean and wear it again. Consider hanging worn clothes out on your clothesline to freshen them up between wearings.


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