1. Seed Saving

    Posted on July 26, 2012 by Howling Hill

    The Greenists are on vacation.  Please enjoy this recycled post.

    One bonuses of participating in any CSA is the availability and access to seeds that are not genetically modified or altered. Thus, I have been seeding some of the bounty from my CSA. So far I have two types of tomato (above), yellow watermelon, honeydew melon, and a couple different types of squash and peppers. All were locally and organically grown here in New Hampshire. I also have all the seeds I ordered earlier this year but didn’t plant because of The Move to Boston.

    Seeding the vegetables and fruits is an excellent way to preserve harvests, genetic diversity, and to save some money.

    To seed a vegetable isn’t particularly difficult. Most times all one has to do is put seeds aside — making sure each seed is devoid of any vegetable matter — when cutting one open. Tomatoes, however, can pose a particular challenge for first time seeders. It took me a while to learn the process. I share it with you my fellow Greenists because I’m awesome (and contrite =)

    First, cut open the tomato(es) and scoop out the seeds. Pull as much of the goo away from the seeds as possible. Then take the seeds and put them in a glass jar (plastic would work but then you get the plastic chemicals leeching problem…) with some water. Let the seeds sit in the sun for a week or two until the goo pulls away from the seeds and the seeds sink to the bottom. Go ahead and agitate the jar on occasion. Once the seeds have separated from the goo, carefully pour out the water and place the seeds on a towel to dry out. Once dry, put them in a bag for the next year after labeling the seeds. If you have more than one variety you are seeding this is very important unless you like surprises.

    Knowing Wolf and I are moving from our beloved Howling Hill to the urban jungle makes my soul cringe. I am not a city person but I will adapt as I have to other changes. I am, after all, human. And humans adapt. And so do plants. We all adapt quite well, actually. I assume that’s why we (plants, animals, and everything else) are alive today: because we adapted to the changes and made the best of present conditions. To bring part of my CSA with me is a comfort. To know I can grow some of the lushness of the food I ate this summer is a fantastic way to bring Howling Hill to Boston. It connects me to the land, connects me to Mother Earth, and connects me to the CSA.

    On a completely unrelated note, our well went dry. Follow our waterless journey at Howling Hill.

  2. The Local Eating Challenge Begins!

    Posted on June 28, 2011 by Deborah

    An abundance of freshness from the farmers market

     

    My month of local eating begins on July 1, 2011. I’ll be posting regular updates on my blog, complete with recipes and tales of my search for local ingredients. Meanwhile, there’s still time for some of you to join me in this adventure. You don’t have to commit for the full month – try it for one week, one day, or even one meal.

    What’s the point of eating local? I hear some of you asking. Here are just a few of the reasons that persuaded me to try it. Read more…

  3. Local Eating – The Coffee Connection

    Posted on May 3, 2011 by Deborah

    graphic from EatLocal.net

    A few weeks ago I posted here on The Greenists site about my plan to take the 100 Mile Diet Challenge in July 2011. I thought it would be a breeze. After all, I live in a rural area with a fine farmers market, I grow my own veggies and raise chickens, and several small farms in my area offer CSAs. I was sure that the only thing on my Exception List would be coffee, that all-important part of a well-balanced meal.

    This post is my confession of ignorance. Read more…

  4. Sustainable Yarn

    Posted on February 10, 2011 by Howling Hill

    Image from Fibrepalooza

    In December a question came in from Kathleen asking “I’d like your input about yarns. What types of yarns should I be looking for other than merino, and how do I know if the dyes are environmentally friendly?”

    Being the resident knitter here at The Greenists, Allie passed the question onto me. It required me to do some research on the subject because, despite being a knitter, I’m still green but not yet green.

    The short answer to the question is pretty similar to the answer to most green questions: go local. Using locally sourced yarn, from local sheep, alpacas, etc supports local farmers. But I wanted a more complete answer than “go local” so I did some research.

    Read more…

  5. Seed Saving

    Posted on September 23, 2010 by Howling Hill

    One bonuses of participating in any CSA is the availability and access to seeds that are not genetically modified or altered. Thus, I have been seeding some of the bounty from my CSA. So far I have two types of tomato (above), yellow watermelon, honeydew melon, and a couple different types of squash and peppers. All were locally and organically grown here in New Hampshire. I also have all the seeds I ordered earlier this year but didn’t plant because of The Move to Boston.

    Seeding the vegetables and fruits is an excellent way to preserve harvests, genetic diversity, and to save some money.

    To seed a vegetable isn’t particularly difficult. Most times all one has to do is put seeds aside — making sure each seed is devoid of any vegetable matter — when cutting one open. Tomatoes, however, can pose a particular challenge for first time seeders. It took me a while to learn the process. I share it with you my fellow Greenists because I’m awesome (and contrite =)

    First, cut open the tomato(es) and scoop out the seeds. Pull as much of the goo away from the seeds as possible. Then take the seeds and put them in a glass jar (plastic would work but then you get the plastic chemicals leeching problem…) with some water. Let the seeds sit in the sun for a week or two until the goo pulls away from the seeds and the seeds sink to the bottom. Go ahead and agitate the jar on occasion. Once the seeds have separated from the goo, carefully pour out the water and place the seeds on a towel to dry out. Once dry, put them in a bag for the next year after labeling the seeds. If you have more than one variety you are seeding this is very important unless you like surprises.

    Knowing Wolf and I are moving from our beloved Howling Hill to the urban jungle makes my soul cringe. I am not a city person but I will adapt as I have to other changes. I am, after all, human. And humans adapt. And so do plants. We all adapt quite well, actually. I assume that’s why we (plants, animals, and everything else) are alive today: because we adapted to the changes and made the best of present conditions. To bring part of my CSA with me is a comfort. To know I can grow some of the lushness of the food I ate this summer is a fantastic way to bring Howling Hill to Boston. It connects me to the land, connects me to Mother Earth, and connects me to the CSA.

    On a completely unrelated note, our well went dry. Follow our waterless journey at Howling Hill.

  6. Travel to the Sea

    Posted on August 26, 2010 by Howling Hill

    Goat meat from a vendor at the Gateway Market and veggies from our CSA. Pickle I made from my garden last year

    Wolf and I celebrate our anniversary and get away to the ocean each year in York, Maine. Since we’ve been vacationing there as a couple for 8 years (I’ve been vacationing there with my family for 38 years) we are well acquainted with many of the local wares available to the the traveler. Local food availability is one of the things we’re taking the time to learn about.

    The CSA we purchase from allows shareholders to double up on their order if the shareholder is unavailable for whatever reason. This is what we chose to do. It required a small amount of pre-planning by calling the organizer of the CSA and letting her know we’d be away and wanted to double up. This allowed us to create a meal plan based on what we already had on hand. The cottage we rent has a kitchen which allows us to save on food costs because we didn’t have to eat out every meal like we would if we stayed in motels or hotels. Read more…

  7. Keep Your Barbecue or Picnic Green

    Posted on May 31, 2010 by The Modern Gal

    picnic
    It’s Memorial Day, the unofficial start of summer, which means lots of people will be breaking out the picnic baskets and firing up the grills for the next few months. Eating outdoors seems like a more natural way to enjoy our food, but it also takes a few extra steps to stay eco-friendly. Here are some reminders of how to enjoy your summer barbecues and picnics without leaving a larger footprint.
    Read more…

  8. The Delicious Benefits of Eating Locally

    Posted on June 16, 2009 by Courtney

    Please welcome today’s guest poster, the lovely Dianne of Dianne’s Dishes. Dianne is an expert not only on cooking delicious meals, but doing so in an environmentally friendly and sustainable manner. 

    Roasted Asparagus with Garlic Scapes

    No matter where you look these days you can find someone talking about eating locally. Some eat local all year round, and I think that’s easier to do when you live in areas of California and Florida that have local produce year round, and others just focus on eating local as much as possible. I fall in the latter category and focus on eating local whenever the opportunity is available.

    There are several ways to eat local and it’s especially easy during the summer months! You can eat as local as you can possibly get and grow your own, you can visit a local farmer’s market or you can join a CSA. You can also do a little research and find out what is actually produced in your area and try to buy exclusively from them whenever possible. You can find a local dairy farm or a local mill, etc. You’d be amazed what might be around that you don’t know about before! But what are the real benefits?

    Read more…

  9. Squirreled Away for Winter

    Posted on January 14, 2009 by Allie

    Yesterday afternoon, I sat down with a cup of homegrown mint tea that I dried myself on our clothes drying rack this fall, and a few mini zucchini muffins I defrosted from the freezer.  Read more…

  10. The End of CSA Season

    Posted on November 24, 2008 by Allie

    This weekend I picked up our last CSA bag for the season.  We won’t be drowning in veggies again until June.  I’m a little bummed and a little relieved at the same time. Read more…

Tip of the Day

If It Doesn’t Smell, Don’t Wash It

19980_m.jpg

According to Real Simple, if every American made an effort to launder less — cutting out just one load of laundry a week per household — we’d save enough water to fill seven million swimming pools each year.

So if it looks clean, and it smells clean, call it clean and wear it again. Consider hanging worn clothes out on your clothesline to freshen them up between wearings.


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